As GM, Ford, and Honda do everything they can to try to re-take market share from troubled Toyota, the advertising guns have been a-blazin.’ You would probably have to have been living under the proverbial rock to have missed GM’s ubiquitous “May the best car win” campaign. So, it brought a wry smile to my face when I stumbled across this online Chevy ad the other day:

Chevy banner ad

Although I’m not 100% certain, I’m pretty sure that the scratching-out-and-scribbling was animated right on the skyscraper ad, which definitely got my attention. Although I’m not in the market for a new car, I even clicked on the ad — which took me to a Canadian Chevrolet landing page cleverly titled “Chevrolet Trophy Case.” And there, the theme is played out quite well, with the headline “We’ve won the awards. Now you be the judge.” What follows is an impressive listing of 7 different awards for 17 different cars.

While I’m guessing the original campaign of “May the best car win” was to encourage consumers to shop Chevrolet and other GM products against the typical segment leaders, Chevrolet has done an excellent job of, once the real industry accolades started rolling in, extending the campaign.

It’s always encouraging to me to see an integrated campaign that can adapt as the rules change, and that uses all media outlets to tell the broad story. For Chevrolet, I can think of personally encountering magazine ads, TV ads, newspaper ads, emails from local dealers, online advertising, and internet landing pages that all tell the same story. (Now, I must admit, the Chevy Twitter and Facebook pages seem to have missed the memo, although they are using the consistent silver car/truck photography.)

What media can you use to tell your story? How well can you integrate all the components? And do you have the patience to tell the same story over and over again until your audience gets it?

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